10.19.2009

Old Town Editions

I recently saw a presentation by Old Town Editions, Alexandria, VA, at the Springfield Art Guild. Not only were the printmaking partners personable, they were incredibly passionate about printing. One is a professional photographer with a business degree and the other is a MFA painter. They aim to get it right.

When they grab the image of the original, they aren't scanning on a flatbed. They call it "capturing," creating an image over about 25 minutes. They explained many of the technicalities and bragged in the best way about their equipment, particularly when compared to traditional commercial printers. They even gave paper swatches to the attendees and we, amazingly, each can have a painting captured for free. Whoa!

So, if your printer makes files small enough that they can be emailed, you need to find another printer. Visit the Old Town Editions website for more educational reading.

Now to decide which one I want to be captured. Better yet, you tell me.

3 comments:

pat said...

"if your printer makes files small enough that they can be emailed, you need to find another printer. Visit the Old Town Editions website for more educational reading."

We here at Old Town Editions would like to clarify this statement.

What we were trying to say was that if the only file of your artwork that you have is small enough to email, then chances are it has lost detail from compressing the file and therefor is too small to print. Files need to be sized down and/or compressed when emailing or preparing the file to add to your web site. When a computer compresses a file it throws out information. Most high quality art scans can not be sent through an email without some form of compression or downsizing.

Double check with your printer or the person that photographed your artwork. They could have just sized your file down for use on the web or through email. If the only file that you can still find is small enough for email then chances are it is too small for limited edition printmaking unless you are making tiny prints. But, it is always worth checking with a professional to confirm whether the image is too small for the sizes you are trying to print.

Thanks,

Pat

Bonnie said...

Of course, any file can be made for emailing, but the primary file should not be. Sorry that didn't come out as clearly as I'd intended.

And you're quite welcome for the exposure and the rest of the article!

pat said...

We greatly appreciate the opportunity to come and talk to the group and the exposure from the article.

Thank you.